KDE Bugsquad – Gwenview Bug Day on March 30th, 2019

We will be holding a Bug Day on March 30th, 2019, focusing on Gwenview. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!

This is a great opportunity for anyone, especially non-developers to get involved!


  1. Check out our Bug Triaging guide for a primer on how to go about confirming and triaging bugs.
  2. Log into KDE Phabricator and join the Bugsquad!
  3. Join the #kde-bugs IRC channel on Freenode to chat with us in real-time as we go through the list.
  4. Open the shared Etherpad for this event (use your KDE Identity login) to select your block of bugs and cross them off.

If you need any help, contact me!

USB Stick Frustrations

Recently I had a USB stick that had a live ISO written to it. On it were a few partitions, Linux formatted with the standard system files you would expect written to it.

I needed to wipe it and format it FAT to move a file. I happened to have a Windows system at the moment. Easy to do, right?

NO! Of course not!

Here was my experience:

  1. In File Manager, right-click the drive to try and erase and re-format it. Nope! That apparently cannot be done.
  2. Open Windows Partition Manager to try and delete the partitions. Partition Manager refused to perform any operations on the drive.
  3. I went and got a Linux system. Move the USB stick to it, and erase the partitions.
  4. I move the USB stick back back to the Windows system to format it and move the file.
  5. Open Windows Partition Manager again and try to make a new partition on this blank USB stick. It consistently locks up trying to make a new partition on it.
  6. Back to Linux! I make a new partition and format it FAT32.
  7. Back to Windows, try to drop the file onto it. File is too large. Ok, that is my fault, I forgot the 4GB limit. Right-click the USB stick to format it exFAT. NOPE! Doesn’t work.
  8. Back to Linux! I format it exFAT.
  9. Back to Windows, drop the file onto it. FINALLY!

ALL I WANTED TO DO WAS FORMAT A USB STICK AND MOVE A FILE!

Ukuu Goes Closed Source

Some of you noticed in my My KDE-Centric Linux Laptop Setup – Part 1 post that I used Ukuu to get the latest mainline Linux kernel. Well, things have changed lately with Ukuu…

As explained by Tony in the Ukuu v19.01 release post:

gothicVI: So ukuu now completely turned into a closed source project?

Tony George: Yes.
Older versions are still open-source. Somebody can develop that version further if they have the time and interest. I may open the source again if I stop working on it (it won’t happen anytime soon).

Comments section of https://teejeetech.in/2019/01/20/ukuu-v19-01/

So, unfortunately Ukuu has gone closed source, and now requires a paid license. If you check my laptop setup post now, I have removed reference to Ukuu due to this, as I just cannot support that. I understand that Tony wants to sustain himself, but there are ways to do that without closing the source and forcing payment:

  • Make the donate button more prominent.
  • Make a donation pop-up to remind people.
  • Set up a Patreon and direct people there to support you (which he had last year, but now seems gone).
  • Move your app to a storefront such as elementary’s AppCenter where you can add a price to your app.
  • Lock certain features behind a “premium” version of the app, but leave the core open source.

Moving to closed source is the wort of the options, and it is a shame to see that happen.

This is a good time to mention to my readers, if you enjoy an app or distro, please donate. Over the years I’ve done exactly that over the years for dozens of projects, even if it is just a few bucks. Especially try to donate using recurring methods such as Patreon if you can. Any little bit helps, and ensures we continue to have a rich open source ecosystem.

New Weather Station

Not long ago, my old weather station died. My wife really enjoys walking downstairs and seeing the current weather on a display in the kitchen. So, I began shopping for a new one. Having experienced our last one, we knew there were some new features we wanted, such as the ability to see and track weather data remotely. I’ve always enjoyed using Weather Underground, and wanted to run my own station that uploads data to them, now was my chance.

After a bunch of research, I settled on an Ambient Weather WS-2902A. This thing is super cool for the price. Great color wireless display, with nearly every sensor you could think of. The sensor stack also runs primarily off of solar, with battery as a backup.

It also reports data to a handful of websites, including their own, which has a pretty nice interface. My primary concern was Weather Underground, which works great. I can also view my weather information on my phone, or via Alexa, which is great for an Amazon house like mine.

One note, make sure to check any network-level ad-blocking system you may have, such as Pi-hole. I noticed by default I was blocking rtupdate.wunderground.com, which is the data upload URL for Weather Underground.

It’s interesting to see the data now. You start to you realize how alive the earth is. For example, during the first night my station was running, my area had a small bit of wind in the middle of the night, like a breath.

KDE Bugsquad – Back in 2019! Ark/Kcalc/Spectacle Bug Day on February 12th, 2019

I hope everyone has had an enjoyable holiday season! The KDE Bugsquad is back in 2019, almost 50 members strong! How awesome is that? We have 11 months left in 2019, and will be continuing our every-other-week schedule as last year, with one event on a Tuesday, one on Saturday, with one project per month. Hopefully that provides you some opportunities to fit it into your schedule.

Our first project this year will actually be a variety pack of smaller projects, each with less bugs than the usual targets. I wanted to start out with some easier ones, while still targeting some important utilities most KDE users use. So, without further delay:

We will be holding a Bug Day on February 12th, 2019, focusing on ark, kcalc, and Spectacle. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!

This is a great opportunity for anyone, especially non-developers to get involved!


  1. Check out our Bug Triaging guide for a primer on how to go about confirming and triaging bugs.
  2. Log into KDE Phabricator and join the Bugsquad!
  3. Join the #kde-bugs IRC channel on Freenode to chat with us in real-time as we go through the list.
  4. Open the shared Etherpad for this event (use your KDE Identity login) to select your block of bugs and cross them off.

If you need any help, contact me!

KDE Bugsquad – Kdenlive Bug Day on December 15th, 2018 (Today!)

We will be holding a Bug Day on December 15th, 2018, focusing on Kdenlive. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!

This is a great opportunity for anyone, especially non-developers to get involved!

  1. Mascot_konqi-support-bughunt.pngCheck out our Bug Triaging guide for a primer on how to go about confirming and triaging bugs.
  2. Log into KDE Phabricator and join the Bugsquad!
  3. Join the #kde-bugs IRC channel on Freenode to chat with us in real-time as we go through the list.
  4. Open the shared Etherpad for this event (use your KDE Identity login) to select your block of bugs and cross them off.

If you need any help, contact me!

Preparing for AI and Automation

I recently had a guest blog post featured on the INE Blog about preparing an IT environment for AI and automation. Check out the post!

Here is an excerpt of the beginning:

It is undeniable that Artificial Intelligence and Automation are in the minds of the public. With major corporations such as Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Microsoft making the news on their artificial-intelligence research and products, and personalities such as Elon Musk, Bill Gates, and Stephen Hawking holding interviews warning of an A.I. apocalypse, it’s no wonder people are talking about it.

Artificial Intelligence has recently migrated into Information Technology, with several companies providing solutions for IT Operations. Executives and managers are quickly eyeing it up, excited by its abilities to make employees more efficient, reduce downtime, and minimize staffing. The marketing for these products is very positive, extolling the simplicity of operations and their effectiveness. The algorithms, as it is explained, will handle everything.

There is a configuration cost to get it up and running and to keep it running smoothly that management may not see at first. There is no “Easy” button here. Depending on the organization, implementing an A.I. and automation platform may require thousands of hours of work. This article aims to provide some thoughts on prerequisites to using A.I. in your IT infrastructure.

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